Image: Master Sgt. Kelvin Oxendine, Enrolled Lumbee Native American (Airman, Author and Leader)

I am pleased to highlight Master Sgt—Kelvin Oxendine from the 116th Operations Group of the United States Air Force. We connected professionally via LinkedIn. Kelvin is a Native American from the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. Many people are unaware that “the Lumbee tribe is currently the largest tribe east of the Mississippi River and the ninth largest in the nation, with approximately 62,000 tribal members.”  I personally discovered the extensive history of the Lumbee a few years ago by a colleague.

Courtesy of: Master Sgt. Kelvin Oxendine

Today, Mr. Oxendine remains an active role model in his tribe. He has authored two books on the history and cultural enrichment of the Lumbee Tribe. Kelvin states, “Proceeds were donated towards emphasizing cultural preservation and environmental issues affecting Native American communities. Oxendine adds “that he is also the first recipient in the 116th ACW and Georgia Air National Guard of the Society of American Indians Government Employees (SAIGE) Meritorious Military Service award. SAIGE is a non-profit organization advocating for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the government workforce by providing them with the necessary tools to reach their full potential.

His two authored books:

Seven Generations – Ancestors of the Present Day Lumbee: Seven Generations – Ancestors of the Present Day Lumbee (lulu.com)

Direct Descendants of Henry Berry Lowery Direct Descendants of Henry Berry Lowery (lulu.com)

Kelvin is a direct descendant of Henry Berry Lowry, a young Native American Revolutionist who rose from the swamps in North Carolina in 1865 to fight racial injustice being directed against his people, who are the modern-day Lumbee Native Americans. Lowry led the Lowry War that lasted until 1872.”UNC (2023) source states that “There are eight (8) state-recognized tribes located in North Carolina: the Coharie, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, the Haliwa-Saponi, the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, the Meherrin, the Sappony, the Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation and the Waccamaw Siouan. The federal government fully recognizes the Eastern Band of Cherokee.” “Lumbee (2023) states, “The Lumbee take their name from the Lumbee River, which winds its way through Robeson County. Pembroke, North Carolina is the economic, cultural, and political center of the tribe.” We at Narrative Matters support and understand that it is essential for all people to share their culture and perspectives from their lenses and not only from the perspective of people that are not of the culture. 

Often Native Americans are referenced historically and not in the present-day culture. It is crucial, as Master Sgt. Oxendine shows that Native Americans are very relevant in present-day contributions.  As a historian and writer myself, I encourage Master Sgt. Kelvin Oxendine continues to write and inform all of us, especially the readership of the Narrative Matters which has a large readership of BIPOC communities in the United States. 

The Narrative Matters!


References:

Lumbee. (2023). Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina

North Carolina. (2023). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Carolina

Oxendine, K.R. (2022). Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1776792479380471

Oxendine, K.R. (2015). Seven Generations – Ancestors of the Present Day Lumbee: Seven Generations – Ancestors of the Present Day Lumbee (lulu.com)

Oxendine, K.R. (2015). Direct Descendants of Henry Berry Lowery Direct Descendants of Henry Berry Lowery (lulu.com)UNC.(2023).American Indian Center FAQs About American Indians – American Indian Center (unc.edu)

Senior Editor, Digital Manager, Blogger, has been nominated for awards several times as Publisher and Author over the years. Has been with company for almost three years and is a current native St. Louisan.

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