October 4, 2021

AFRODECENDIENTES: AFRO-LATINO & AFRO-INDIO

Carmen Robles
Hispanic Blogger/Advocate for Change

While the interrelated crises impact entire communities, they put a particularly heavy burden on Afrodecendientes: Afro-Latino and Afro-Indio descendants. NOTE: “Indio” refers to anyone who is of indigenous Latin American descent.  It is a term that is essential in understanding Indigenous-Afro-Latino identities.

Structural inequality. Gender, ethnic and racial discrimination. These pillars of socio-economic exclusion, are being worsened by the pandemic.

Structural inequality. Gender, ethnic and racial discrimination. These pillars of socio-economic exclusion, are being worsened by the pandemic.

While the interrelated crises impact entire communities, they put a particularly heavy burden on Afrodecendientes: Afro-Latino and Afro-Indio descendants. NOTE: “Indio” refers to anyone who is of indigenous Latin American descent.  It is a term that is essential in understanding Indigenous-Afro-Latino identities.

The video images of the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis Police Officers created a spark causing a dominoes effect that ignited a global movement.  After months full of anguish, despair and frustration for the black and brown communities, the topic of police brutality and how it disproportionately affects African-Americans Afrodecendientes: Afro-Latino and Afro-Indio communities continues to be in the forefront.  

In a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center in 2016 —which focused on Afro-Latinx for the first time in history— it was reported that “24% of Latinos, almost a quarter of the 57 million, identify as Afro-Latinos, Afro-Caribbean or of African descent. Only 18% said they were Black, 24% identified as Hispanics and the majority, 39% said they identify as white.”  Nothing on Afro-Indio’s though, prompting me to go looking for information.   

I was excited to find David Rodriguez, a pioneer in Independent Hip Hop media (Night Sessions TV, HEADLINERS DVD Magazine), Video Producer & Editor, Independent Researcher and Writer.  Author Washington’s Negro Friends, a story of the lost history of men who were free Black and American Patriots.  

His website provides a platform for Afro-Latinos to share their perspective on culture, ancestry and history.  David was drawn to the studies of the history of the Americas to learn how it relates to his own personal ancestry, engaging audiences through a set of documentary style episodes aimed to entertain and enlighten all audiences.  David’s most recent work is a pilot based off his series ‘Afro-Latinos in America-Part 2 The Silent Majority. The Hidden history of Afro-Latinos.’

David will be joining us on an upcoming segment of Conversaciones de Salud to share his story, his series and to help address the complex needs of the Afro-Latino and Afro-Indio individuals, families and communities.  David Rodriguez will share his viewpoints reuniting the African roots to Latino and Indigenous cultures. 

‘Convesaciones de Salud’ tells our history our way.   This Afro-Latino/Afro-Indio project uses social media platforms to hold a series of Spanglish (Spanish/English) webcasts showcasing our sameness.  

This perfect storm of activism will be documented for the historical archives of The Decade of African Descent 2015-2024: Recognition, Justice, and Development.  Validating the reality that our African roots run deep. 

Martin Luther King Jr. told labor leader icon Cesar Chavez in a 1966 telegram: “Our separate struggles are really one — a struggle for freedom, for dignity and for humanity.”  Profound words!

Come take the journey with our guest David Rodriguez and uncover a legacy untold. 

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Friday, September 10th, 2021

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