The news was announced by the Broadway production on Instagram.

“The Phantom family is saddened to hear of the passing of Quentin Oliver Lee,” they wrote on Instagram. “Quentin brilliantly led our North American tour in 2018. Our hearts are with Quentin’s family and friends.”

Lee’s wife Angie also confirmed his death on his profile on Instagram.

Quentin Lee (@quentinsings) • Instagram photos and videos

Quentin Lee (@quentinsings on IG)

“Quentin passed in the wee hours of the morning. It was the most beautiful moment of my life. I saw his last breaths, held his hand tight, and felt his heartbeat slowly drift away. He had a smile on his face, and was surrounded by those he loves. It was peaceful, and perfect,” she wrote.

“He was an incredible man, husband, father, son, brother, friend, singer, actor, and disciple of Christ with great faith in his Father in Heaven. To say “he will be dearly missed” doesn’t reflect the scope of the people and communities he has created and touched.

“To say ‘he will be dearly missed’ doesn’t reflect the scope of the people and communities he has created and touched. If we let him, he made us better people.”

Quentin is mostly known for his portrayal in a national tour of “The Phantom of the Opera” which soared him to being referenced to as a critically acclaimed vocalist and actor.

Born Jan. 28, 1988, Lee graced the stage in several Broadway and off-Broadway productions. Most recently, he appeared in the Tony-nominated revival of “Caroline, or Change” which opened last October. That same year, he was featured in the off-Broadway show “Oratorio for Living Things.”

“The Phantom family is saddened to hear of the passing of Quentin Oliver Lee,” the broadway production captioned a picture of Lee on Instagram. “Quentin brilliantly lead our North American tour in 2018. Our hearts are with Quentin’s family and friends.”

The Grammy award winning, baritone-voiced singer shared his diagnosis in June via an Instagram post. He also welcomed his supporters to follow his journey along with him by joining his Caring Bridge journal for updates. Lee revealed he had Covid-19 in May and after two weeks of his symptoms not going away, he went to the doctor. After his cancer diagnosis, Lee continued to post in his journal his health updates.

According to American Cancer Society, the African-American community is disproportionately affected colorectal cancer. The community is 20% more likely to be diagnosed with it and 40% more likely to die from the disease over any other ethnic group. Screening can provide early detection and prevention altogether. It is recommended that African-American begin screen at the age of 45, even five years younger than the regular recommended age.

People at higher risk for colorectal cancer include people with:

  • A family history of colorectal cancer or certain types of polyps
  • A personal history of colorectal cancer or certain types of polyps
  • A personal history of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease)
  • A known or suspected family history of a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Lynch syndrome (also known as hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer, or HNPCC)
  • A personal history of radiation to the abdomen (belly) or pelvic area to treat a prior cancer

The most common symptoms of colorectal cancer include:

  • A change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation, or narrowing of the stool, that lasts for more than a few days
  • A feeling that you need to have a bowel movement that’s not relieved by having one
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Blood in the stool, which might make the stool look dark brown or black
  • Cramping or pain in the abdomen (belly)
  • Feeling tired or weak
  • Losing weight without trying

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